Scam alert: Falling for a false offer

Over the last month and a half, the job hunt has been a little slow. I’ve finally learned to engage in the practice of applying to as many openings as I’m able. As expected, some of the responses have included “the job posting has closed.” Some applications have yielded no response at all. Until last week, I had yet to fall for a scam offer.

I received an invitation to apply to a freelance job on Upwork.com. I did, and almost immediately received a response. We took our conversation to Google Hangouts, where I received more information on the company: Alembic Pharmaceuticals. After IMing back and forth for a couple hours, my interviewer showed my responses to the head of the department. He returned with positive news! I got the job!

false website, scam, alembic pharmaceuticals
It’s sad that I didn’t notice the “a 100 years” until uploading this picture.

But there were enough things to make me think this was a scam. For one thing, the company was apparently based in India. And as happy as I was to immediately get a job that paid enough to cover my bills, it was unusual to get the offer so quickly. I held off on a grand social media announcement that I was employed again, but I told a few friends and family members.

Those friends and family members had serious doubts. To them, it was an obvious scam. It was just too good to be true. Since I’m staring down student loans, doctor bills, and all the other usual money-sucking obligations, I was willing to overlook a few oddities. Like how they were going to send me a check that I was to spend on purchasing equipment and software for a home office before I could start working.

However, caution started to win out. I forwarded the official job offer to my dad and asked his thoughts. At first, he seemed just as convinced as I was. We chatted on the phone, and he suggested I call the number on their website to verify the offer. I was hesitant to call an international number, so he suggested I call the number for the office in New Jersey.

That threw me off. Nowhere on the website I was looking at was there a mention of an office in New Jersey. Everything I saw said India or Mumbai. We discovered we were looking at two different websites. The site the interviewer had directed me to: alembicpharmaceuticals.com. The site my dad found: alembicusa.com. When comparing the two, the first thing I noticed was the company logo. It was a near copy, but not exact.

graphic design, logo scam
The scammer site is on top; the real Alembic is below. If not for my graphic design background, I might not have noticed the difference.

So I called the New Jersey office and got ahold of the hiring manager. She confirmed in under a minute that the offer was fraudulent. Sad to say that means I’m still unemployed.

I tried to email the real Alembic company with the details of their imposters, but their only listed email account has a full inbox. In hindsight, it was 100% obvious this was a scam. But staring down the barrel of all those bills made me want to believe otherwise. Thankfully, I caught wise before I could give up any crucial information. I wanted to share this story so I could ask everyone else on the job hunt to please be smarter than me and not fall for these kinds of tricks.