Revisions and revisions: A never-ending cycle

Happy Easter, my friends! As I mentioned in my last blog post, revisions for the next draft of The Thieves of Traska are currently underway. It’s been a little tricky to find time to write and edit now that I’m working 30-40 hours a week at the patisserie. I’m still rearranging a few things so I can write every day and (try) to blog every week. I think aiming for a blog post on Mondays will work better. Fingers crossed!

A week ago, I had no idea how I was going to revise Thieves. I had a list of problems, courtesy of my beta readers, and a vague idea of what would fix them. But I also had a list of responses that I wasn’t sure what to do about:

  • “The chapters feel too short.”
  • “I’m not sure why Garrison sticks around.”
  • “It doesn’t feel like anything connects to a bigger scheme.”
  • “Not enough really happens in the beginning to compel me forward.”
  • “The pacing is too slow.”

Alright, redistributing where the chapters begin and end wasn’t too hard. I wrote out all the events on my whiteboard and figured out where it made the most sense to put breaks. That left a few blanks to fill in, but I’d figure that out later.

More than a few blanks, since the picture I took before erasing my board is a little fuzzy in spots. (Spoilers all over that board.)

Why does Garrison stick with Claire? According to enough of my readers, it had to be because he has a crush on her. Since that is not the real reason, I need to tweak his dialogue in places so that it becomes clear. I’m still bouncing ideas off of people on how to make it make sense.

Those last three comments drove me crazy. Nothing connects to a larger plot?! Nothing happens in the beginning?! What is wrong with the pacing?!

Asking my readers didn’t offer any clear answers. It wasn’t until I started poking around at what other people said about the pacing in YA books that I got to the heart of the problem.

Everyone in The Thieves of Traska has a personal goal driving them forward. It’s great for their motivation, but it’s not enough for the story. There’s no common goal any of them are working toward together that relates to the overall plot. Sounds like a pretty big thing to be missing from a sixth draft, right? But it’s not entirely missing. There are plenty of little actions that could be connected to something greater if I just add that central point.

So what do you add to The Thieves of Traska to make all the petty crimes Claire commits connect to a bigger picture? Why not some sort of heist? Sure! Now the revisions will include a heist.

What about the lack of events in the beginning, and the slow pace? That one was trickier to figure out. It’s not so much that nothing is happening; the stakes just aren’t high enough in what does happen. For example: when Claire and Garrison are on the road to Traska, one of the highlights of the trip is when they’re attacked by bandits. That’s exciting! But buried beneath a lot of uneventful walking.

Now, instead of mutually deciding to journey together, I have Garrison unaware that Claire is following him. These revisions help build up to the solution to the “why does Garrison stick around” problem. And, by adding the risk of discovery, the stakes are just a little bit higher.

It’s not such a boring walk anymore, is it? If I take the same approach to every chapter, perhaps the pacing problem will be fixed, as well.

Call for beta readers: The Thieves of Traska Draft 6

This is it, my friends: the official call for beta readers. Last time we were here, I was absolutely terrified. Only one friend had read most of The Thieves of Traska by that point. If my readers didn’t like the story, I might have spent a significant amount of time crying and maybe given up on it altogether.

But my readers liked it. Some even loved it.

For the second time, I ask for volunteers. The Thieves of Traska now has nearly 300 pages, and more than 86,000 words.

If you want to be a beta reader…

  • Comment on this post, tweet at me, or email me at Amanda (at) ajswitz (dot) com by Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017
  • Specify your preferred format for reading (Microsoft Word document, PDF, .mobi, etc.)*
  • Please briefly explain your interest in being a beta reader

*NOTE

If you provided feedback on Draft 4 last year, you are eligible to receive a professionally printed and bound copy of Draft 6. The number of printed copies I order will be based on the number requested. If you would like to receive a printed copy, please notify me no later than Jan. 15, 2017.

Beta readers should prepare to provide a thorough, honest critique beyond “good,” “bad,” or “x/5 stars.” To avoid interfering with your reading process, I will save specific questions until after you’ve finished reading.

For a brief description of the story, check out the new Books tab on the top of the site!

2017 brings beta copies of The Thieves of Traska!

I’ve been writing 2017 instead of 2016 on my notes since mid-November. Finally, that can stop being a mistake. Happy New Year, everyone! We have a few exciting announcements to start the year off.

First: I quietly finished inputting the edits I received from beta readers early last year. Even though no one said extensive edits were needed, they happened. Since readers last saw Draft 4, eight chapters have been added, and more than 30,000 words.

Draft 4, Draft 6, beta copy, comparison
A few more edits than I meant to make.

Your positive feedback assured me that I’m not half bad at this whole writing thing. There was also an unexpected side effect: I rewrote the plot for the rest of the series. You’ve all helped me make this a story worth reading.

Our second announcement: now that Draft 6 is complete, I need another set of beta readers! Anyone interested in reviewing a digital copy is welcome to comment here, shout out to me on social media, or email me (amanda AT ajswitz DOT com) at your convenience. I’ll be posting an official call for beta readers next week.

Besides having more content, this draft is special. It is, perhaps, THE DRAFT. The one that will be submitted to agents and publishers. Of course, there are sure to be more edits. But The Thieves of Traska might just be ready to seek publication.

And that brings me to the third announcement. A limited number of print and bound copies of The Thieves of Traska, Draft 6, will be ordered this month. Certain readers (some who read the previous draft, some who haven’t read any of it) have difficulty reading the story as a book when it’s not in book form. For some, a print version — that isn’t a 300-page stack of copy paper — would be most convenient.

A photo posted by Amanda Surowitz (@ajswitzy) on

That’s a daunting read for anyone.

A friend brought another use for these printed copies to my attention when I asked for help formatting the text. Potentially, this could appeal to agents and publishers and help get me published. Whether or not it helps, I will share what I learn in later blog posts.

This is an out of pocket expense for me. Due to the cost, there won’t be an open call for requests for a printed copy. Only those who provided feedback on the previous draft are eligible to request the printed copy of Draft 6. For my overseas readers, have no fear about your own eligibility. One copy is already destined for the UK. International shipping is not a concern.

As this year is already off to an exciting and productive start, let me once again wish you all a happy 2017!

To change or not to change — because of one reader

In class, it was fairly easy to gauge if a change was necessary to improve a story. One person would make a suggestion, and the other 18 or so would discuss ways it would or wouldn’t work. If several people agreed that the edit would reinforce the theme, feel more in character, or correct the flow of a scene, I’d work it in.

With The Thieves of Traska, the pool of readers is much smaller and more spread out. There’s no physical gathering of writers to discuss their thoughts and brainstorm with me. I have to compare the responses to each other, see where the comments line up, and go from there.

So what happens when only one of six readers has an opinion? Do you throw the idea out because they’re the only one? Or do you imagine others readers have the same opinion?

I do the latter. Usually.

The first reader to respond suggested a change to an early scene. No one else commented on that scene, but I felt the edit would be an improvement. I ended up asking a couple of the other readers what they thought, and they agreed that, while they hadn’t thought of it, the scene would be way better if I adjusted it. There wasn’t anything wrong with the scene. It just got better.

Another reader was the only one to comment on a character’s psychological condition. I thought her advice was so helpful, I didn’t ask any of the other readers to weigh in.

But another reader mentioned having trouble keeping track of all the characters. There were too many people to remember, let alone which side they were all on. No one else had this problem. I mentioned it to another reader, and she couldn’t see the need to reduce the number of names. And neither can I.

That same reader has also had opinions on character development none of the others mentioned, but these are opinions I agree with. They mesh with some of the other comments I received, including the one about a certain character’s psychology.

It might be easier to make these kinds of judgment calls with a room full of writers to help me debate whether a change makes sense or if there’s a better way to address the same problem. But with or without them, it’s up to the writer in the end what changes . The next round of beta readers will determine whether those edits actually helped.

The Thieves of Traska needs beta readers!

Hello, friends! I’m very pleased to announce that I have finally finished the fourth draft of The Thieves of Traska! And that means we’re ready for the next step: beta readers!

When I first announced the project a couple years ago, I said it would be a novella. Now — at a whopping 52,580 words — it stands to be the first installment in a trilogy. It is also the longest piece of fiction I’ve ever written and the only one I’m prepared to show to a test audience.

Honestly, it’s scary. It’s like critique day in class all over again, but the stakes feel much higher. I’m not asking for feedback on a 10-page short story that I can edit in an hour or so. I’m asking for feedback on a 186-page novel that is supposed to launch my dream career as an author. So no pressure, right?

Even so, I come to you, my friends, to recruit some beta readers. I need volunteers willing to read the whole novel and give me your feedback. Whatever format you need — Word doc, PDF, Google doc, printed copy, etc. — I will gladly send it. And then I will forget about it for six weeks while you read and come back to it with fresh eyes.

If you’re interested in reading this fantasy adventure about a runaway and a fugitive getting swept into a dangerous game of intrigue between the shady criminal leagues who control the city of Traska, let me know! Comment here, email me at amanda (at) ajswitz (dot) com, or reach out on social media.

If you already volunteered before I finished writing, then keep an eye out for a message from me. Thank you all in advance and I greatly look forward to hearing from you.