Scam alert: Falling for a false offer

Over the last month and a half, the job hunt has been a little slow. I’ve finally learned to engage in the practice of applying to as many openings as I’m able. As expected, some of the responses have included “the job posting has closed.” Some applications have yielded no response at all. Until last week, I had yet to fall for a scam offer.

I received an invitation to apply to a freelance job on Upwork.com. I did, and almost immediately received a response. We took our conversation to Google Hangouts, where I received more information on the company: Alembic Pharmaceuticals. After IMing back and forth for a couple hours, my interviewer showed my responses to the head of the department. He returned with positive news! I got the job!

false website, scam, alembic pharmaceuticals
It’s sad that I didn’t notice the “a 100 years” until uploading this picture.

But there were enough things to make me think this was a scam. For one thing, the company was apparently based in India. And as happy as I was to immediately get a job that paid enough to cover my bills, it was unusual to get the offer so quickly. I held off on a grand social media announcement that I was employed again, but I told a few friends and family members.

Those friends and family members had serious doubts. To them, it was an obvious scam. It was just too good to be true. Since I’m staring down student loans, doctor bills, and all the other usual money-sucking obligations, I was willing to overlook a few oddities. Like how they were going to send me a check that I was to spend on purchasing equipment and software for a home office before I could start working.

However, caution started to win out. I forwarded the official job offer to my dad and asked his thoughts. At first, he seemed just as convinced as I was. We chatted on the phone, and he suggested I call the number on their website to verify the offer. I was hesitant to call an international number, so he suggested I call the number for the office in New Jersey.

That threw me off. Nowhere on the website I was looking at was there a mention of an office in New Jersey. Everything I saw said India or Mumbai. We discovered we were looking at two different websites. The site the interviewer had directed me to: alembicpharmaceuticals.com. The site my dad found: alembicusa.com. When comparing the two, the first thing I noticed was the company logo. It was a near copy, but not exact.

graphic design, logo scam
The scammer site is on top; the real Alembic is below. If not for my graphic design background, I might not have noticed the difference.

So I called the New Jersey office and got ahold of the hiring manager. She confirmed in under a minute that the offer was fraudulent. Sad to say that means I’m still unemployed.

I tried to email the real Alembic company with the details of their imposters, but their only listed email account has a full inbox. In hindsight, it was 100% obvious this was a scam. But staring down the barrel of all those bills made me want to believe otherwise. Thankfully, I caught wise before I could give up any crucial information. I wanted to share this story so I could ask everyone else on the job hunt to please be smarter than me and not fall for these kinds of tricks.

Progress: Getting organized after losing a job

This little reunion was one of the best ways to start the new year.

Over the last month, there was a lot for me to be happy about. Christmas with the family had been wonderful. Progress on The Thieves of Traska was in an excellent place. I went to Albany to see a friend and go to a concert.

For a little while, I got a better handle on my stress at work. Some good opportunities were headed my way. I was even going to resume my classes in the spring. And then I lost my job last week.

It shocked many, but surprised very few. All the well-wishes and support I’ve received from friends and family have almost entirely included some form of congratulations. It’s been no secret how much stress I’ve been under.

Just before all this happened, I’d read Tee Morris’ blog post 3 Tips on Getting Back on Track When Life Knocks You Down. His post was so helpful in calming me down and finding what I should do next, I emailed him a thank you. He was kind enough to reply with another invaluable blog post: 5 Things to Do After You Lose Your Job.

His point about avoiding a social media meltdown made me reconsider whether or not I should write this post. But I’m not here to rant or make my former employer look bad. In fact, I still have a lot of love for the company. I want to follow in Tee’s footsteps and use this experience as a chance to maybe calm someone else down and help them figure out their next step.

Both of his posts stress the importance of getting organized again. I’m not sure it’s what he had in mind, but my first step was moving my furniture all around and sorting out my physical space. At the very least, I got to use up some energy shoving my massive dresser back and forth across the room. Progress is progress, right?

Then I reorganized my time, taking some of my old routine to structure a new one. Bianca gets her insulin shots at the same times as before. I start the morning with a cup of tea, then work on writing for a few hours. Just before noon, I get coffee, take care of a few chores, and then turn to the job search. I trade off days searching and applying. At 3 p.m., I get the next cup of tea and start catching up on reading news and blogs. After 5 p.m., the focus is on dinner and relaxing. I can read, watch a movie, catch up on a TV show, play video games, or work on some art.

Bianca’s just happy I have more time to rub her belly.

Perhaps the greatest advantage of creating this kind of schedule is that it cuts down on panic. Every time your brain starts demanding when you’ll have a new job, you can calmly remind it, “We found some excellent opportunities yesterday afternoon, and we applied to them today. Tomorrow we will find more.”

One of my favorite professors always talked about the importance of self-discipline. It’s what makes you consistently early to class or work. It’s what keeps you from binging articles instead of writing or applying to jobs. It keeps you making progress.